6.27.2016

Bezalel: What is Ministry?

Interesting fact for the day:

Exodus 31:1-5 records the first place in scripture where someone is "filled with the Spirit."  Can you guess what the Spirit empowered them to do?  Not prophetic words, not healing, not angelic tongues, not preaching, nor worshipping, not even leading the people.

Bezalel was filled by God's spirit to be the artist and craftsman in charge of the artwork and finely crafted instruments for the Tabernacle.

It makes you think...

Ministry is often conceived of as "pastor-work."  In most places the nurses, teachers, gardeners and neighbors are looking over the pastor's shoulder saying, "that looks fun, can I try?"  But that isn't the way it is supposed to be!

Ministry is supposed to be the work of Christians in the world.  The pastoral role ought to be guiding and equipping Christians in that fundamental ministry task of partnering with God in His work around us, in us, and through us.  In short, the pastor should be looking over the shoulders of the nurses, teachers, gardeners, and neighbors and saying, "that looks fun, can I try?

2 comments:

passamike said...

Flipping burgers, roasting coffee, installing and cleaning sewers, landscaping, lawyering, governing/legislatng, parenting, physical intimacy, sunrises and sunsets, so on and so on. Could ministry have more do to with living life under the guidance of the Trinity within any and all situations and less to do with some sort of religious vocation? Rambling mind is curious...:) Here's how Willard puts it, "God's intent for us is that we would grow to the point we would do what we want because what we want is part of that shared understanding with God, our friend." If this is even close to what "ministry," empowered by God's spirit uniquely made visible in each of us might be, then sign me up...:) Love ya Steve. Never stop searching for "shoulders to look over."

Steven Schenk said...

You invited me to look over yours, and you never stopped looking over mine. I pray that you and I both live out the fullness of Willard's words.